Event Review: A Night Out So They Can Read

By Jessica Wright

photo 2Outsmarting Poverty One Book At A Time

On November 7th, Traveling Stories and IDW Publishing co-hosted A Night Out So They Can Read at the Moniker Warehouse. The event was a fundraiser to bring money and awareness to the non-profit organization, Traveling Stories: a company focused on improving the literacy of children around San Diego and internationally.

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Book Review: Dorothy Must Die

By Ameerah Holliday

Before her explorations of Oz began, Danielle Paige  worked in the televisionDanielle Paige industry, receiving the Writers Guild of America Award and several Daytime Emmy nominations. A graduate of Columbia University, Paige currently resides in New York, where she has reimagined a classic story and taken us back into Oz. Dorothy Must Die  is Paige’s very first Young Adult novel and the start of a very unique series. The novel, published in April 2014, has since been nominated for a 2014 Book Shimmy Award and its story continues to grow with two prequel novellas No Place Like Home and The Witch Must Burn as well as a highly anticipated sequel.

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Book Review: Thorn Jack

By Jessica Wright

thorn-jack-225Earlier this year Katherine Harbour burst into the literary world with the release of her first novel, Thorn Jack, the first book of the Night and Nothing series. Despite this being her first book, Thorn Jack not only is beautifully written but also is a story that will remind the reader of why faerie tales are timeless pieces of literature. Harbour grew up in Albany, New York and currently resides in Sarasota, Florida. In addition to writing, Harbour enjoys oil painting and likes to keep an open mind about the existence of faeries.

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Commentary: Finding Refuge

By Breeann Kirby

JORDAN-US-SYRIA-REFUGEES-KERRYThere are now over 3 million Syrian refugees, the video begins. Stark white words on black to state a stark message: 3 million is more than the population of most cities. And all of these people no longer have a home. In the Zaatari Refugee Camp alone, opened in July 2012 outside of Jordan, the current estimation of inhabitants is over 82,000 people—the same population as Santa Fe, New Mexico. Continue reading

Interview: Rob Latham

By Adam Bicksler

Robert RobLatham is a tenured professor of English at UC Riverside. He is also an editor and contributor to the journal Science Fiction Studies. Latham is a major player in the formation of the Science Fiction and Technoculture Studies PhD concentration within the UC Riverside English department.

In October, Latham saw a labor-of-love come to fruition with the publication of The Oxford Handbook of Science Fiction, a behemoth of an anthology that he edited for two years. Latham is also one of the editors for 2010’s The Wesleyan Anthology of Science Fiction and the author of 2002’s Consuming Youth: Vampires, Cyborgs, and the Culture of Consumption. Continue reading

Interview: Kelly Creagh

By Ameerah Holliday

Nevermore CoverWhen the typical, popular high school cheerleader teams up with the school’s goth outcast, things are bound be interesting, but when that pair is swept into the chaotic and mysterious world of Edgar Allen Poe then it’s bound to be Kelly Creagh’s Nevermore Trilogy. This Trilogy revolves around cheerleader Isobel Lanley and school outcast Varen Nethers who are paired together in their English class for a project on Edgar Allen Poe. While working together they discover far more about each other and Poe than ever expected, as they are mysteriously transported into the stories and mysteries of Edgar Allen Poe.

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Book Review: Jen Wang and Cory Doctorow’s “In Real Life”

By Breeann Kirby

InRealLifeCoryDoctorow cover
©Jen Wang, used with permission of First Second Books

In the collaborative adaption of his short story “Anda’s Game” (published originally in Salon nearly a decade ago) to a young adult graphic novel (published by First Second,  14 October 2014), Cory Doctorow freely acknowledges that Jen Wang did “all the heavy lifting in the adaptation” and though he “wrote the underlying story and edited her script and […] implementation […] Jen is the true soul of the graphic novel.” In a separate interview with Comics Alliance, Wang adds, “There were about eight or so drafts, with the first one being closest to the original story. With each draft I pushed a little further into new territory […] the details changed, and I added a third Act where we see what happens after Anda decides to help Raymond.” Wang’s adaptive changes make In Real Life an important and compelling read for both the young reader as well as the adult reader who wants to reconnect with hope in humanity and second chances. Continue reading